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About accidentals

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About accidentals

Post by naslovonaslovo on Fri Apr 23, 2010 7:05 pm

Hi everyone!

I have a question for you wise people about accidentals Smile

Something appeared in my sheets music and I've never seen it before... It looks like this:
(#) and than goes some note... That bar goes like this: B,E,D#,E,A#,C#,G,F,G,C(#),F,E.
If it means anything, the peace is in e minor so F should be played as F# as well...

I have no idea what to do with that C(#)... Is it sharp or not and, in any case, why does it look like that?

Thanks! Smile

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Re: About accidentals

Post by naslovonaslovo on Fri Apr 23, 2010 7:08 pm

And why do I have all these weird simbols in the title?! What a Face
I never wrote that.... Laughing

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Re: About accidentals

Post by frank on Sat Apr 24, 2010 5:52 am

Wikipedia has the answer:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accidental_%28music%29


Courtesy accidentals

Although a barline is nowadays understood to cancel the effect of an accidental (except for a tied note), often publishers will use a courtesy accidental (also referred to as a cautionary accidental or a reminder accidental) as a reminder of the correct pitch if the same note occurs in the following measure. This usage varies, although a few situations are construed to require a courtesy accidental, such as

* when the first note in a measure is one which had had an accidental applied in the previous measure
* after a tie carries an accidental across a barline, when the same note appears again in the subsequent measure.

Other uses are inconsistently applied.

Courtesy accidentals are sometimes enclosed in parentheses to emphasize their nature as reminders.

So, yes, it is a C#.

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Re: About accidentals

Post by naslovonaslovo on Sat Apr 24, 2010 11:24 am

Thanks...
But I don't quite understand... Sad
Well, never mind, I'm new at this, it's important that I know that I should play it sharp...

Thanks! Smile

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Re: About accidentals

Post by frank on Sat Apr 24, 2010 12:06 pm

"parentheses" just means this: (#) Smile In simpler words: A sharp-sign is in effect for the whole bar line, but it can be repeated within a bar line to remind you when playing a piece that it is still in effect. And because this is not really needed, sometimes it is written in parantheses.

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