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Arpeggios and broken chords.

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Arpeggios and broken chords.

Post by Kelly on Sun Sep 12, 2010 4:04 pm

The definition of an arpeggio and a broken chord are basically: chords played one note at a time. But there has to be some difference between them, of which I can't think of. cyclops

Any suggestions?
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Re: Arpeggios and broken chords.

Post by Kelly on Fri Sep 24, 2010 1:13 am

I was googling about this subject like crazy to find some consistent answers, with no success. But just now I remembered about Andrew's term glossary on his website and I found my answer. Smile

Arpeggio the notes of the chords are to be played quickly one after another (usually ascending) instead of simultaneously. In music for piano, this is sometimes a solution in playing a wide-ranging chord whose notes cannot be played otherwise.

Broken chord a chord in which the notes are not all played at once, but in some more or less consistent sequence. They may follow singly one after the other, or two notes may be immediately followed by another two, for example.

I've posted this just to clarify things and in case someone had the same doubt.
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Re: Arpeggios and broken chords.

Post by jytte on Fri Sep 24, 2010 8:37 am

I've been wondering too. Thanks Kelly.
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Re: Arpeggios and broken chords.

Post by frank on Sun Sep 26, 2010 8:24 pm

I think usually it is called "arpeggio", if it is over more than one octave, as Andrew says in this video:


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Re: Arpeggios and broken chords.

Post by Kelly on Sun Sep 26, 2010 8:34 pm

frank wrote:(...) if it is over more than one octave, as Andrew says in this video.

I watched his video(s) at least 3 times and I'm very attentive to every word, but this one escaped me. Thank you, Frank! Very Happy
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Re: Arpeggios and broken chords.

Post by frank on Sun Sep 26, 2010 9:22 pm

BTW: I think Wikipedia has a better definition:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arpeggio

An arpeggio is a type of broken chord. Other types of broken chords play chord notes out of sequence or more than one note but less than the full chord simultaneously. Arpeggios can rise or fall for more than one octave.

And the "arpeggiated chord" example is only three notes.

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Re: Arpeggios and broken chords.

Post by Kelly on Sun Sep 26, 2010 10:51 pm

I read that on wiki but I was concerned about the definition because I thought: Andrew didn't say anything about them rising or falling for more than one octave.

Thanks again, Frank.
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